JINGLE BELLS

JINGLE BELLS

£5.75Price

For 2 Violins, Viola/Alt. Violin 3, Cello, Opt. Cello2/Double Bass,
Sleigh Bells and optional Piano

 

 

Standard: Easy

 

 

Running time: 1 min 30

  • What you will receive....

    Your download will contain the score and parts in PDF format, an MP3 audio file of a full performance of the piece, and an additional piano and sleigh bells MP3 backing track to aid rehearsal and preparation for performance!

     

    See our How it Works page for more information. 

  • About the piece

    HISTORY

     

    ‘Jingle Bells’ was written by James Lord Pierpoint (1822-1893). He lived a colourful life and was a rebellious figure who also happened to be the uncle of the financier J.P. Morgan. He wrote this piece to conjure up memories of sleigh rides in Massachusetts, and not originally as a Christmas tune. It was published in 1857 by a Boston music publishing house as ‘One Horse Open Sleigh’. Two years later it was re-published as ‘Jingle Bells’.

     

    PERFORMANCE NOTES

     

    This is a simple version of ‘Jingle Bells’ is in D major. The tune is first (and in the reprise) in the 1st violin. In the second part, the tune is split between the cello and the viola/violin 3. I simplified the tune a little here to avoid tricky string crossings.

     

    To help real beginners, the tune is in the piano also. I have stated that the piano part is optional, but I feel the arrangement would work best with the piano. It does work without however. In performance it would work with the sleigh bell and piano backing track. I had to combine these two into one track because the sleigh bells begin on their own, before the piano. It would be too tricky to
    do with live sleigh bell players and with the recorded piano backing track as the sleigh bell players wouldn’t know when to start! If players wish to play live sleigh bells (which I hope they will!) then they could join in when the strings come in perhaps – or whenever they want!! Obviously with no piano or live piano that problem is solved. It would work best with a string band, with more than one person to each part. But of course it can have as many people as you like on each part, providing you can hear the tune.